What’s the story with CBD?

image1

What is CBD commonly used for?

Over decades, researchers have found that THC may help treat pain, nausea, loss of appetite and other problems, while CBD was thought to be biologically inactive in humans. But in the past 10 years, scientists have concluded that CBD may be quite useful. Dozens of studies have found evidence that the compound can treat epilepsy as well as a range of other illnesses, including anxiety, schizophrenia, heart disease, cancer and other neuropathic pains.


Neuropathic pain, which is frequently chronic, arises when neurons in the brain or peripheral nervous system become hypersensitised and generate abnormal or prolonged impulses. There are many causes of neuropathic pain, including diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, brachial plexus lesion, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and cancer.
 

Check out this amazing resource!

Cannabinoid Receptors

Cannabinoid receptors, located throughout the body, are part of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in a variety of physiological processes including appetite, pain-sensation, mood, and memory. Cannabinoid receptors are of a class of cell membrane receptors in the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. 


Although CBD has little binding affinity for either of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), cannabidiol modulates several non-cannabinoid receptors and ion channels.

 

Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptors are thought to be one of the most widely expressed Gαi protein-coupled receptors in the brain. This is due to endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition, a very common form of retrograde signaling, in which the depolarization of a single neuron induces a reduction in GABA-mediated neurotransmission. Endocannabinoids released from the depolarized post-synaptic neuron bind to CB1 receptors in the pre-synaptic neuron and cause a reduction in GABA release due to limited presynaptic calcium ions entry.


 CB2 receptors are mainly expressed on T cells of the immune system, on macrophages and B cells, and in hematopoietic cells. They also have a function in keratinocytes. They are also expressed on peripheral nerve terminals. These receptors play a role in antinociception, or the relief of pain. In the brain, they are mainly expressed by microglial cells, where their role remains unclear. While the most likely cellular targets and executors of the CB2 receptor-mediated effects of endocannabinoids or synthetic agonists are the immune and immune-derived cells (e.g. leukocytes, various populations of T and B lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, mast cells, microglia in the brain, Kupffer cells in the liver, astrocytes, etc.), the number of other potential cellular targets is expanding, now including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts of various origins, cardiomyocytes, and certain neuronal elements of the peripheral or central nervous systems.


CBD also acts through various receptor-independent pathways—for example, by delaying the “reuptake” of endogenous neurotransmitters (such as anandamide and adenosine) and by enhancing or inhibiting the binding action of certain G-protein coupled receptors.


Check out this amazing resource!


What is Anandamide?

The first endocannabinoid isolated (from porcine brain) and structurally characterised was arachidonylethanolamide (AEA), commonly designated anandamide. The name comes from the Sanskrit word ananda, which means “bliss”, and amide. Bliss means happiness that invokes physiologic and psychologic harmony and, in Buddhism, indicates an elevated consciousness since Ananda was one of the principal disciples of the Buddha. Anandamide acts in pain, depression, appetite, memory, and fertility (due to its uterine synthesis). Anandamide is synthesised enzymatically in brain areas that are important in memory and higher thought processes, and in areas that control movement. Anandamide, or arachidonylethanolamide, is an amide derivative of arachidonic acid and ethanolamine. It is synthesised by hydrolysis of the precursor N-arachidonoyl phophatidylethanolamine, which is catalysed by the enzyme phosphodiesterase phospholipase D. After release from the postsynaptic terminal, anandamide interacts with presynaptic cannabinoid receptors. It is rapidly removed from the synaptic space by a high-affinity transport system present in neurons and astrocytes. Once internalised, anandamide is hydrolysed by the enzyme fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an intracellular membrane-bound enzyme. In cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex, FAAH is expressed at high levels in the somatodendritic regions of neurons postsynaptic to CB1-positive axon terminals. Thus CB1 receptors and FAAH have a close and complementary anatomical distribution.

 

Check out this amazing resource!


Pets & CBD

Common CBD uses for your pet: 

  • Anxiety
  • Pain
  • Noise phobia
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Epilepsy
  • Inflammation
  • Gastrointestinal Issues
  • and more!

Hemp is Hope

Che Uses for hemp:

Human Food: You can use it in quite a few recipes. Because of its health benefits, humans can consume it. You can make salad oil using hemp. Hemp seeds are eaten in the same way you eat regular nuts. You can add hemp seeds to your cake batter to produce baked goods. Hemp is high in essential fatty acids and amino acids. These are important to your diet. You can crush the hemp seed and make oil or flour.

Clothing: Hemp is used to manufacture clothing such as jeans and sport clothing, lingerie and other high fashion apparel. Hemp uses makes clothing last longer. Some of the celebrity clothing labels that use hemp fibers are Ralph Lauren, Armani and Calvin Klein.

Plastic: Plastic products made from hemp are usually biodegradable and can aid in reducing landfills. In the past, hemp uses spanned packing materials and products like CD jewel cases.

Paper: Paper is sometimes made using hemp. It is more economical to use hemp to make paper. It saves the trees and protects the wildlife and forests. This is a nice way to protect the environment.

Construction Materials: Hemp plant can make strong and durable materials for construction. For example, cement made from hemp uses minerals and core fibers. When hemp is used to make homes, there is stronger resistance to bad weather and less damage incurred during bad weather.

Fuel: Hemp uses includes making fuel such as bio-diesel. The petroleum industry has embraced the use of hemp in making its products. Ethanol production is also popular in the hemp industry. 


Check out this amazing resource!

Get Started with Veriheal